Interesting Facts About Electric Batteries

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AC Delco Batteries

A battery is an amazing piece of technology that is used by many of the devices that we regularly use. Therefore, our lives are connected and powered by them similar to the way they are connected in circuits. An electric battery can contain one or more electrochemical cells that generate power from the reactions between the battery cathode and anode, which is used to provide power to electrical devices through external connections. These devices can be flashlights, laptops, electric cars, or smartphones. These batteries provide electrical energy through chemical reactions rather than any mechanical motion as in an electrical generator.

The passage of electricity in a battery is done by the movement of electrons from one terminal to the other. This motion of electrons is called electricity in a circuit. The negative terminal, or the anode of the cell, is the source of electrons from where these particles travel to the positive terminal of the cell, known as the cathode. The electric device that needs to be powered up is connected between these two terminals. Batteries come in a number of shapes and sizes, and different devices can require different sorts of batteries with various amount of cells present.

This fascinating invention has several unheard but interesting facts that one should know.

1. The first battery was invented in 1798

Although the usage of batteries is found from the time of Benjamin Franklin, it was Alessandro Volta who built the first electrochemical battery in 1798. It was called the voltaic pile and could continuously provide an electric current to a circuit. His model was a stack of copper and zinc plates, separated by brine-soaked paper disks. Alessandro Volta thought at that time that it is an inexhaustible source of energy and the corrosion effects were an anomaly, rather than a part of the electrochemical reactions in the cell that was later showed by Michael Faraday in 1834.

2. Archaeologists suspect that batteries were present in ancient times

Although there is no certain proof of it, some archaeologists believe that batteries were in use from a much earlier age than it is generally recorded. In 1938, a discovery was made in Iraq of a 5-inch ceramic pottery jar that contained a tube of copper with a rod of iron. The general opinion was that the pot was used for storage purposes. Then, in 1938, he suggested that the people belonging to the age of these artifacts might have used them as a galvanic cell for electroplating gold onto silver objects. However, the origin and purpose of the object remain unclear as there is no evidence supporting any argument.

3. Three billion batteries are purchased by Americans every year

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) suggests that each year, Americans throw away more than three billion batteries. That’s about 180,000 tons of batteries. More than 86,000 tons of these are single-use alkaline batteries. If these dead alkaline batteries were to be lined up with one’s end meeting the other, it is believed that only one year of these thrown away batteries can circle the Earth at least six times. About 14,000 tons of rechargeable batteries are thrown away in the United States.

The high amount of wastage of alkaline batteries can sufficiently bring damage to the environment as the battery contains harmful materials and toxins, which can leak into the environment once it is crushed.

4. Ben Franklin was the first to use the term “battery” in electricity

In 1749, Benjamin Franklin first used the term “battery” to describe a set of linked capacitors or Leyden jars he used for his experiments with electricity. The jars were actually panels of glass coated with metal on each surface. These capacitors were charged with a static generator and discharged by touching metal to their electrode. When many of these capacitors would come together in a ‘battery’, it would give a bigger discharge. Originally having the generic meaning of “a group of two or more similar objects functioning together” like in an artillery battery, the term came to be used for voltaic piles and similar devices in which many electrochemical cells were connected together in the manner of Franklin’s capacitors.

5. The first rechargeable batteries came in 1859

The first rechargeable battery was a lead-acid battery, which was invented by Gaston Plante, and it could be recharged by passing a reverse current through it. Plante’s first model of the rechargeable consisted of two lead sheets separated by rubber strips and rolled into a spiral. In 1881, an improved version was invented by Camille Alphonse Faure with a lead grid lattice into which a paste of lead oxide was pressed. This model was easier for mass production of batteries and, compared to Plante’s designs, this was more convenient to use due to its lighter weight. Then, gradually, rechargeable batteries kept developing.

6. Eveready invented the flashlight

The famous brand for batteries and electrical equipment, Eveready Battery dates back to two centuries ago. It was a pioneer in the industry even then and Conrad Hubert, the founder of Eveready batteries, invented the first flashlight in 1898. It is also known as the electric hand torch. Moreover, Eveready was the first brand to introduce the D-size batteries for the first handheld flashlight.

7. The first miniature batteries were introduced in the 1950s

The first miniature batteries were not manufactured until the 1950s, which were also introduced by Eveready Battery in 1955. These batteries were designed for hearing aids. Later in 1956, Eveready produced the first 9-volt battery. This battery is commonly used in smoke detectors today. The most common use of miniature batteries is probably in wristwatches, which were developed and introduced in 1957 also by the Eveready Battery Company.

8. They have long lives even when expired

A battery is not a product that should be tossed away once it is past its expiry date, like milk and other products. The expiry dates simply indicate the time until the batteries will work at their best, but batteries have long lives even after that.

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Skilled labor openings in this country

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Mike Rowe

Just read a commentary from Mike Rowe about skilled labor openings in this country. Like others of his, and other authors, it is spot on. Simply put, few want to learn how to get their hands dirty. Or after they do, they realize that it is often hard work and wimp out.
To me it seems there is no passion. No inner desire to accomplish something “really meaningful”. To be a part of the building of, or maintaining of, their physical world. No inner pride of knowing they made something of significance. Flipping a switch and light shine. Turning a faucet and things get clean. Flushing a toilet and down goes what is supposed to. Not their dreams, but success in a job well done. Every time I drive the bypass from lower Muncy to the East of Montoursville, I know I had a part in building that road. Helping keep the machines working. That kind of passion and desire is what needs to be taught in schools. To make a real difference and contribution to the world. Not some
computer game that will fade away. Or some biased liberal college course that only seems to offer the ability to say, “You want fries with that?” and a heap of loan dept when they get out.
I have run wires, soldered pipes, built buildings, worked in grease and poop, gotten burned from welding, helped build roads, an am proud of it.
People with high degrees have asked me how I know how to do these things. We each appreciate what each knows and contributes, but the world needs more like me. Yeah, maybe like me. One who has a passion to do things, humor to make it fun, and an understanding that people like me are needed.

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Ted needs al lof his supporters to get behind him with prayers

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tedOur email after SC tonight. NOW more than ever Ted needs al lof his supporters to get behind him with prayers, money and the belief of a better tomorrow! GOD bless! John N Katie, Before I board a plane for Nevada, the next nominating contest, I’m stopping to personally reach out to you. Tonight, we saw Republicans uniting around our shared conservative message. The only message that will ultimately defeat the Democrats this fall. The pundits are now calling this a three person race. That’s why, before I take off — I need to know you are still with me. John N Katie, can I still count on you? You see: after fighting hard in Iowa, New Hampshire, and now South Carolina — I’ve dug deep into my campaign budget. I’ve just been told I must raise another $1 million dollars in the next 48 hours in order to be able to take on the Washington Establishment in the Nevada Caucuses and the Super Tuesday primaries. I know it’s a lot to ask for your help again, but I also know it’s the only way. I am only here today because of you, and I can only compete tomorrow if you continue with me. John N Katie, this is our time. After everything the Washington Cartel has thrown at us and the millions spent against us by the lobbyists and my opponents, we are just getting started on the road to winning the nomination. Will you continue your support tonight? Right now, I’m making you a promise, John N Katie. No matter what the Washington Cartel and the liberal media throws at me, I will always be a consistent conservative — both in word and deed. You will never have to worry about me caving to the Washington Establishment, and I will work as hard as I can to win this campaign and reignite liberty in our nation. If you accept this promise, then I’m hoping you will make a commitment to me as well. Will you commit to support my campaign? $1 million in the next 48 hours is going to be hard — but if you chip in to help tonight — I know we get there. I’M WITH YOU TED Thank you and God bless, Ted Cruz

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UPDATE SAFE AT HOME WITH HIS FAMILY!!!!

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Ok so I’m a lot upset. This baby wandered in my yard today and wouldn’t come to me. But whatever Mello said to him he went right in the yard with him. Not even scared even though Mello is every bit of 85 lbs. at first I tried to follow him but he seemed lost and went back to Mello. Normally I would put Mello in the house but I didn’t want this little one hit so I left him outside while I ran out. I returned with the family and he came out of the fence and right up to us. No note in my door nothing. What the heck? Now it’s getting late and the temp is dropping. I’m walking around looking in every passing car to see if anyone misses him. So I went around to my neighbor to see if he lived on the next block. Nothing.

My neighbor said she was going to the bus stop for her son and put him in the car. She drove all over asking people on the street and all the kids getting off the bus and no one. He has a Halloween sweater on. How could you let him roam around with these maniacs on the road. So I am posting him here he is getting a bath and a nice meal and I hope someone in Bay Shore recognizes him. They better know if he has a collar and he better act like he knows them because everyone wants him. I don’t understand why the owner isn’t driving up and down every block I would be. Brook Ave and James are my cross streets in Bay Shore.

https://web.facebook.com/giselle.agnew

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